Close Contact definition and an amendment to the 2m 15-minute rule

If a person tests positive for coronavirus (with (PCR) test) and you were in any of the circumstances below with them, either in the 48 hours before or 10 days after their symptoms started, or since they received a positive test, you are defined as a close contact.

This applies even if you were wearing a face covering.

  • Been within 2 metres of someone for more than 15 minutes – either as a one-off contact or added up together over the course of one day – (this is new advice from the Government)
  • For example, three separate five-minute contacts, or 15 one-minute contacts, within 2 metres of a person who has COVID-19 in one day now counts as a close contact
  • Within one metre for one minute or longer without face-to-face contact
  • Travelling in a small vehicle with them
  • Face-to-face within one metre of them (including being coughed on, face-to-face conversation).

 

Becoming a Sikh Chaplain

If you can answer yes to the majority of questions, please contact us for further details of how you might be able to get involved as a Sikh Chaplain.

  • Are you aged between 18-75?
  • Are you sufficiently fit to meet the physical and emotional demands of hospital visiting and be able to satisfy occupational health screening?
  • Are you able to relate warmly and simply in a relaxed manner?
  • Do you have a good knowledge of the Sikh faith with habits of prayer and public worship. Are you able to speak confidently about your own faith?
  • Are you open minded and able to be non-judgemental?
  • Are you able to keep confidentiality and adhere to a code of conduct?

Clinically Extremely Vunerable


People with the following conditions are automatically deemed clinically extremely vulnerable:

  • solid organ transplant recipients
  • people with specific cancers:
    • people with cancer who are undergoing active chemotherapy
    • people with lung cancer who are undergoing radical radiotherapy
    • people with cancers of the blood or bone marrow such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma who are at any stage of treatment
    • people having immunotherapy or other continuing antibody treatments for cancer
    • people having other targeted cancer treatments that can affect the immune system, such as protein kinase inhibitors or PARP inhibitors
    • people who have had bone marrow or stem cell transplants in the last 6 months or who are still taking immunosuppression drugs
  • people with severe respiratory conditions including all cystic fibrosis, severe asthma and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • people with rare diseases that significantly increase the risk of infections (such as severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), homozygous sickle cell disease)
  • people on immunosuppression therapies sufficient to significantly increase risk of infection
  • problems with your spleen, e.g. splenectomy (having your spleen removed)
  • adults with Down’s syndrome
  • adults on dialysis or with chronic kidney disease (stage 5)
  • women who are pregnant with significant heart disease, congenital or acquired
  • other people who have also been classed as clinically extremely vulnerable, based on clinical judgement and an assessment of their needs. GPs and hospital clinicians have been provided with guidance to support these decisions

Categories Uncategorised

Birth of Khalsa

GURU Gobind Singh, the Tenth Guru of the Sikhs founded the Khalsa (Servants of God) at the Vaisakhi gathering in 1699, at Keshgarh Sahib near Anandpur, where he had arranged for followers to meet him at the Vasakhi Fair in Anandpur. On that day Guru Gobind singh asked for a man to step forward from the congregation, who was willing to die for his cause. One man Daya Singh stepped forward, and followed Guru into his tent. When Guru came out of the tent, his sword was stained with blood; and asked for another volunteer. One by one Dharam Singh, Himmat Singh, and Sahib Singh came forward. One after another they entered Guru’s tent, and the Guru emerged alone with his blood stained sword. The crowd was nervous, until five men then emerged from the tent, and were nominated as Panj Piares; or the five beloved ones.

The Guru put water in a bowl for sprinkling over the five in a simple initiation ceremony. He said prayers as he stirred the water with a short steel sword; symbolising the need for strength. The Guru’s wife, Mata Sundri, then came forward and placed some sugar crystals into the holy water or amrit as a reminder that strength must always be balanced by sweetness of temperament. After completing his prayers, the Guru then sprinkled the amrit over the five.

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Matrimonial

Ramgarhia Matrimonial Services

COVID-19 case numbers as London is now in Tier 4 and numbers are rising rapidly across the whole of the UK; therefore, the team has decided to suspend our services. Source: gov.uk





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    How did it all begin?

    In 1959, well-respected people now had come to England to earn a living which was very hard for them. First of all, they had to find a place to live, which was very difficult because as people saw the face of the person they were going to rent a room to, they turned them away.

    Finally, they received a place to live. Then they decided to build a Gurdwara for the generation to come, as there was only one Gurdwara in the country at that time. They searched for land and finally received some in Southall on Oswald Road. Where they purchased the land (in 1969) there was a laundry, so a lot of hard work had to be put in to turn the old laundry building into a Gurdwara.

    There was no one to pay the workers so everything was done voluntarily. The construction of Ramgarhia Sabha started in 1970. The workers worked hard voluntary on Sundays and after work and made the making of Ramgarhia Sabha their main priority.

    After a while, Ramgarhia Sewak Jatha started in 1974 and the Ramgarhia Education and Music Academy.

    An Old Rectory site was purchased in 1989-1990. Three acres of land was purchased for a £1 million. The Old Rectory was to be used for sports and educational development.

    Ramgarhia Sabha appeared in the news, which proved a lot of progress had been made. Some of the articles are: Sikhs on target £1 million Sports Complex self-help Sikhs build new temple etc. …

    In 1971 the building was completed, it had taken just one year for voluntary workers to complete this building in their spare time.

    After the opening, the Gurdwara turned out to be small. Therefore several houses were purchased; one to extend the size of the Gurdwara, and one was and is lent to a family in need.

    A house at the back of the Gurdwara is now used as a library. Ramgarhia Sabha then purchased a hall, in 1971, activities started at the hall in 1974. You could do, karate, table tennis, hockey, badminton and also have meetings for all etc.

    Anand Karaj

    THE SIKH MARRIAGE CEREMONY

    The couple and their parents stand up and take blessings from God, thereafter, the father of the bride places the fringe of the bridegrooms’ scarf in the hands of the bride, a gesture of responsibility to one another and the willingness to accept each other in the new phase of their lives.

    The four shabads are recited from the Guru Granth Sahib composed by Guru Ram Das Ji, the fourth Guru, recorded on pages 773-774.

    The bride and bridegroom both listen to the shabads and as the shabads are sung in turn they bow their heads to the Guru Granth Sahib accepting and promising to take their vows and to fulfil them. As the shabads are sung by the Ragis (musicians), the couple stand up and walks around the Guru Granth Sahib calling to God and the Congregation to witness their acceptance.

    Marriage is the union of two souls and companionship for spiritual advancement. A transition and new phase of life being entered by the bride and bridegroom.

    THE FIRST SHABAD

    THE PROMISE TO LOVE EACH OTHER – Look to the Guru Granth Sahib for your guidance and remember to mediate the name of God and follow the path of truthful living and love from within your heart and keep faith in Waheguru and you will be blessed with happiness – Dedication.

    THE SECOND SHABAD

    THE PROMISE TO MERGE COMPLETELY AND DEVELOP AS ONE SOUL – Respect each other and dispel all fears and shares your happiness equal to your sorrows, Commitment.

    THE THIRD SHABAD

    THE PROMISE TO BE FAITHFULL –Speak to each other with sweetness and love and do not forget Waheguru and the Holy Congregation, and in your excitement keep control, Communication.

    THE FOURTH SHABAD

    THE PROMISE TO BE TOGETHER THROUGHOUT THE UPTURNS AND DOWNTURNS THAT LIFE WILL BRING – The wish of your hearts is solemnized in the presence of God and graces your existence throughout eternity.

    Barjinderpal Kaur Lall

    Vaisakhi


    Vaisakhi (also spelled Baisakhi) is the festival which celebrates the founding of the Sikh community known as the Khalsa. It is celebrated on April 14 each year. On Vaisakhi day in 1699, Guru Gobind Singh summoned Sikhs from all over India to the city of Anandpur Sahib. At this gathering, the Guru called upon Sikhs to uphold their faith and preserve the Sikh religion. Guru Gobind Singh then lifted his sword and asked that anyone prepared to give his life for his faith to come forward. There was a big silence, but the Guru went on repeating his demand. One Sikh finally came forward and followed the Guru into a tent. Shortly after, the Guru reappeared alone with his sword covered in blood and asked for a second volunteer. Another Sikh stepped forward and again the Guru took him into the tent and reappeared alone with his sword covered with blood. This was repeated until five Sikhs had offered their heads for the Guru. Finally, the Guru emerged from the tent with all five men dressed piously in blue. Guru Gobind Singh called the five Sikhs the Panj Pyare, the Five Beloved Ones.

    See:  http://www.sikhismguide.org/vaisakhi.shtml

    The Victory Of Good Over Evil

    Objective:
    To read the reading of the Sikh story of Diwali and to think about how we can apply the principles in the story to our lives. The Sikh New Year occurs in April, but they too observe this popular festival of Diwali in ways very similar to Hindus. In Sikh homes, divas are lit, presents are exchanged and children enjoy fireworks and bonfires.

    These festivities are used by Sikhs, however, not to remember the victory of Rama and Sita over evil, as is the case with Hindus: Sikhs use the festival to celebrate an important event in Sikh history, which actually happened at the time when Hindus were celebrating Diwali.

    The Festival Story – GURU HARGOBIND
    In the days of the fifth Guru Arjan, times were hard for Sikhs living in northern India. The Muslim emperor who ruled over India was called Jehangir; he arrested Arjan, who died while still the emperor’s prisoner. Arjan’s son, Hargobind, took over the leadership of the Sikhs in 1606. He established friendly relations with the emperor for a time since they both happened to be found hunting. It was not long, however before Hargobind was suspected of treachery because he had gathered an army together and constructed a fort in the city of Amritsar which later was to become the famous centre of Sikhism. Hargobind’s enemies told the emperor that the Guru was calling himself a king and was planning revenge for his father’s death. As a result, Guru Hargobind was imprisoned in a fortress at Gwalior.

    At this time there were fifty-two Hindu princes being held in the same prison. They were badly treated and given little food because they had conspired against the emperor. Hargobind gladly shared with them whatever food he was given. Sikhs used to come to the prison every day. They were not allowed to see their leader so they simply stood outside the prison walls and prayed. This protest went on day after day and, each day, there seemed to be more and more Sikhs standing silently outside the fortress. Eventually, the emperor was told of this protest at the prison and he decided to investigate personally the charges against Hargobind. Finally he pronounced that the Guru was innocent and ordered his release: officers were sent to tell Hargobind that he could leave as a free man.
    When the fifty-two princes heard the news, they were pleased for the Guru but felt rather sorry for themselves for there was no suggestion that they would be released and they would now be denied the extra food, to supplement their poor diet, which Hargobind had passed on to them.

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